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Never bet against a donut.

I feel I might possess the honor, maybe, of having taken the most majestic photo of Los Angeles’ landmark Randy’s Donuts ever. How noble this kitsch!

I feel I may possess the honor of having taken the most majestic photo of LA landmark Randy’s Donuts ever. Noble kitsch!

How can we miss donuts if they won’t go away?

Restaurant Hospitality has a nice trend piece on donuts this morning, which declares them in midst of a grand comeback and includes the phrases “spiked donuts” (Vanilla Bean with Vodka Custard, for example) and “strawberry fennel.”

And the March issue of Saveur agrees, although with the European flair its name suggests refers to the state of our global donut resurgence as a “renaissance” and employs the terms “doughnut artisans” and “perfect sinker:”

“Doughnut artisans, dreaming up inspired flavors and investing in high-quality ingredients, have been popping up all over the country. One pioneer is Mark Isreal, owner of Doughnut Plant in New York City. Since 1994 he has been handcrafting varieties as alluring as roasted chestnut; fresh coconut cream; and the burnt-sugar-glazed custard-filled crème brûlée using organic and locally sourced ingredients. Isreal rotates the flavors as the fruits he uses for his glazes go in and out of season. He even has flour milled to his specifications, all in the pursuit of the perfect sinker.”

Although, if you go to Pinterest and punch in “donut” and scroll, the first major brand you see is still the ol’ reliable Dunkin.

I have a tendency to put clips of The Simpsons in these blog entries, yet today I resist. I am showing discipline. Which is, of course, seldom the case when donuts are involved.

Anyway, donuts are hot now. As the Krispy Kreme sign likes to say.

UPDATED 3/13/13, 2:44 p.m.: Driving home last night, I heard this NPR story about how Dunkin Donuts was pledging to go green by using “100% sustainable palm oil” in its donuts, to help fight rainforest deforestation in Malaysia. A pragmatist in the article is quoted as saying, “There’s still an issue that ‘sustainable’ means many different things to many different people.” And yet, it continues to be the case: never bet against a donut.