Oh, Burger King, how far you’ve come since “Subservient Chicken.”

This is a pretty good example of a desperate person trying to feed the social media day in and day out and getting caught. What kind of brand does this make Burger King look like (another not-so-difficult question).
I suspect this is a pretty good example of a beleaguered person trying to feed social media day in and day out for a major company, and getting caught doing something desperate. So: What kind of brand does this make Burger King look like (another not-so-difficult question)?

Or maybe it’s “How Far You’ve Gone Away, Round the Bend, Way, Way, Way Far Away.”

There’s a useful Facebook fake account called “Condescending Corporate Brand Page,” and it’s one long cautionary tale of what not to do if you’re in charge of an insatiable Facebook (or any social media) feed for a company.

It should make you think long and soul-searchingly before you lightly begin a social media feed in the first place, even. Remember: if you bring a social media account into the world for your restaurant, you’ll have to feed it every day. Every day. And when you get desperate, you’re likely to accidentally be condescending. And then they’ve gotcha.

Anyway.

Let’s put that bit of foolishness out our minds (oh, wait, Condescending Corporate Brand Page has another piece of foolishness from Burger King for you here first). Let’s watch the case study of Subservient Chicken, then watch somebody play around with it:

Now that’s an entertaining, innovative web presence that evokes an entertaining, innovative corporate entity (a.k.a., “company”) (sorry, that might have come off as condescending). The site does, admittedly, make it seem like the corporate entity is aimed at young men. Which turned out to be their big undoing. But, as a man who sometimes enjoys imagining himself as young, it was fun while it lasted.